SpaceX Executes in-flight Abort Test of Crew Dragon Spacecraft

SpaceX Executes in-flight Abort Test of Crew Dragon Spacecraft

SpaceX effectively tried the abort system of its Crew Dragon rocket Jan. 19, one of the final achievements before a crewed test flight that could happen when this spring.

A Falcon 9 carrying the Crew Dragon rocket lifted away from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center at 10:30 a.m. Eastern, one day after the poor climate delayed the past launch event.

Around 84 seconds after liftoff, the Crew Dragon lighted its eight SuperDraco engines, pulling the vehicle away from the Falcon 9. The rocket later jettisoned its trunk segment and sent parachutes, splashing down in the Atlantic Ocean around 32 kilometers seaward almost nine minutes after liftoff.

While a delayed review of the data from the test will probably take weeks, both NASA and SpaceX authority said the test seemed to go true to form.

At the briefing, Musk said that the Crew Dragon rocket that will fly the Demo-2 practice run, with NASA space travelers Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley on board, ought to be prepared before the end of February. In any case, different audits for the system, just as ISS plans, meaning it will take some time considerably after the shuttle is prepared before the mission can launch.

The Falcon 9 rocket used for the test separated and detonated a few seconds after the Crew Dragon escape. That breakup and the resulting fireball was normal, as SpaceX authorities said preceding the test that the main stage booster, making its fourth flight, would not endure the test.

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Claude Denni

About the Author: Claude Denni

Claude Denni was born and raised in San Jose. Claude has worked as a journalist for nearly a decade having contributed to several large publications including the Daily Democrat here in Californiar and NPR. As a journalist for Coastal Morning Star, Claude covers national and international developments.

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